Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699); Large garland of flowers - Botanical - Hand coloured copper engraving - 1680
Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699); Large garland of flowers - Botanical - Hand coloured copper engraving - 1680
Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699); Large garland of flowers - Botanical - Hand coloured copper engraving - 1680
Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699); Large garland of flowers - Botanical - Hand coloured copper engraving - 1680
Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699); Large garland of flowers - Botanical - Hand coloured copper engraving - 1680

Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699); Large garland of flowers - Botanical - Hand coloured copper engraving - 1680

$320.00 Dollar

Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699)

41 x 29 cm

Issued in 'Livre de toutes sortes de fleurs d'apres nature...' 1680

Later hand colour. On fine laid paper with plate marks.

Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer (12 January 1636 – 20 February 1699) was a Franco-Flemish painter who specialised in flower pieces. He was attached to the Gobelins tapestry workshops and the Beauvais tapestry workshops, too, where he produced cartoons of fruit and flowers for the tapestry-weavers, and at Beauvais was one of three painters who collaborated to produce cartoons for the suite The Emperor of China.

Born in Lille in 1636, Monnoyer first studied in Antwerp as a student of Davidsz de Heem, before going to Paris where he rapidly established his reputation and set a style of decorative flower painting for the adornment of great French residences. In 1665 he was accepted as a member of the Academy; in 1673 he exhibited four paintings at the Salon. Patronized by Le Brun, Louis XIV's Minister of Arts, Jean Baptiste Monnoyer was employed to decorate the royal palaces at Versailles, Saint Cloud, Vincennes, le Grand Trianon, Meudon and Marly. He also designed floral motifs and borders for the Gobelins and Beauvais tapestry works. In 1678 the Duke of Montagu, British Ambassador to Louis XIV, persuaded Monnoyer to accompany him to England, where he won immediate acclaim, painting flower pieces and still lifes to adorn the homes of the aristocracy. His works decorated Boughton, Montagu House (now the site of the British Museum), Windsor Castle, Kensington Palace and Hampton Court; his patrons included Queen Anne, Mary II, the Duke of St. Albans and the Earl of Carlisle.