1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press
1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press
1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press
1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press
1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press
1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press
1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press
1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press

1548 Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490-1556) - Woodcut of Printing Press

$240.00 Dollar

Master Woodcut by Heinrich Vogtherr (the Elder) (1490 in Dillingen an der Donau – 1556 in Vienna) was an artist, printer, poet and medical author of the Reformation period.

Depicts a Printing Press.

Published in 1548 in the great Stumpf Chronicle with descriptive text on the invention of printing, dating its beginning to Johann Faustiu in 1466.

Offered on full folio leaf. 37.3 x 23.2 cm

Later hand colour.

Vogtherr probably trained with Hans Burgkmair in Augsburg. After working from c. 1522 in Wimpfen, he moved to Strasbourg towards the end of 1525, where he worked as a painter and where he became a citizen in 1526. From 1536 he ran a printing business in Strasbourg, publishing medical works which he probably wrote himself, and a 'Kunstbüchlein' in 1537, a pattern book with designs for painters and decorative artists, to which his son Heinrich Vogtherr, who became a master in 1541. Together with Burgkmair's son, Hans Burgkmair (c. 1500-59), he made a series of etchings in 1545 of standing armoured soldiers with coats of arms of patrician families of Augsburg (Hollstein, 3-4), of which there is a set in the British Museum. He probably lived during part of the 1540s in Augsburg, where his son was resident from 1541 to 1554, and also in Zürich, where, among other woodcuts, he designed maps and topographical woodcuts for an illustrated chronicle of Switzerland, published by Christoph Froschauer (1521-64). In 1546 he was back in Strasbourg, and in 1550 he became court painter and oculist to the Emperor Charles V in Vienna, where his woodcuts were also published.